Know Your Rights: Tenant Rights While Living in a Rental in Canada

Jul 10, 2024

Someone sitting in the dark by a window of an apartment in the city
Someone sitting in the dark by a window of an apartment in the city

Understanding your rights as a tenant is crucial when renting a home in Canada. Whether you’re signing a new lease or navigating an ongoing tenancy, knowing your rights and responsibilities can protect you from potential disputes with the landlord and ensure a smooth rental experience. 

In this guide, we’ll explore:

  • Tenant Responsibilities

  • Landlord Responsibilities 

  • What’s Included In Your Lease Agreement 

  • Tenant Rights By Province

Tenant Responsibilities 

As a tenant in Canada, you are responsible for following these house rules for tenants, no matter which province you rent in:

  • Paying your rent in full and on-time

  • Keeping the rental property clean and maintained

  • Allowing the landlord or property manager to enter your home to conduct repairs or to show prospective tenants the space if you are moving out, with proper notice

  • Contacting the landlord if anything needs to be repaired or serviced

  • Move out of the property when the lease ends and hand over the keys 

Since you do not own the property, you are not allowed to:

  • Withhold rent in the case of negligent repairs 

  • Sublet or assign the lease to someone else without contacting the landlord first

  • Change the locks without the landlord’s permission

  • Renovate without the landlord’s permission 


Landlord Responsibilities 

Some key landlord responsibilities include:

  • Collecting rent 

  • Keeping the property in good condition and in compliance with health and safety regulations 

  • Perform and pay for repairs if something breaks 

  • Provide everything that comes with the apartment and is included in the rent (i.e. refrigerator, heating, stove, washer and dryer) 

  • Get rid of household pests (if any) 

  • Provide a copy of the lease 

  • Follow a legal procedure to evict the tenant if they don’t pay rent 

  • Provide adequate notice and receive the tenant’s permission to enter the property

What to do if your landlord enters the property without permission:

Usually, the landlord must provide at least 24 hours' notice before entering the property. If they fail to do so, you can file a complaint with your province’s landlord-tenant board. Each LTB is linked in the chart below. 

The landlord can only enter without your permission in these scenarios:

  • If there is an emergency and entry is necessary to protect life or property

  • If the unit has been abandoned

  • If they have a court order

Landlords must provide you with the basic appliances and utilities like heating, electricity, hot water, cold water, a fridge, and a stove, but the cost of these may or may not be included in your rent. This is something to ask your landlord before signing the lease so you know exactly what’s included and what you’ll need to pay extra for. 

Additionally, tenants must pay for any extra basic utilities like internet and cable – these are generally not included in the rent. 

Chexy now lets you bundle your home phone, wifi, and tenant insurance coverage. Not only will this help you build credit on regular bill payments, but you can reduce your Chexy fee by 0.10% to 0.30%, helping you save money. 

Tenant’s insurance is also a common request from landlords. It’s not legally required, but some landlords prefer you to have it and will put it on the lease agreement. 


What’s Included in Your Lease Agreement in Canada? 

A lease agreement is a legally binding contract that details all of the legal terms the tenant and landlord agree to. Ensure you read and understand it fully before signing anything. Most leases will include the following:

  • The names and contact information for you and the landlord

  • The rental property address

  • The monthly rent you have agreed to pay and what utilities it includes (if any)

  • The date rent is due each month and how much the landlord can increase rent in the future 

  • How long the rental period is (i.e. six months or one year) 

  • Conditions for ending the lease or subletting it to someone else 

  • Details on when and how the landlord can enter the rental property 

  • Any repairs or upkeep that is your responsibility 

  • Any restrictions, such as pets or smoking 

Landlords can legally ask you:

  • For proof of income and an employment letter to ensure you can pay the rent 

  • How many people will live on the property

  • If you have any pets or smoke 

  • For employer or previous landlord references 

  • To run a credit check 

Landlords can not legally ask you:

  • For your social insurance number (SIN)

  • Whether you plan to have any children

  • Your marital status 

  • If you have family visiting 

  • About your ethnic background, sexuality, religion, or food preferences

Landlords cannot discriminate against you because of age, disability, family or marital status, race, religion, sex, or gender. 

What can you do if your landlord discriminates against you? 

This type of discrimination violates the Human Rights Code, and you can file a complaint with the Human Rights Tribunal in your province. 

For example, if you live in Ontario, you can file a complaint with the Human Rights Tribunal in Ontario. However, if you are sharing a kitchen or bathroom with the landlord, this falls under an exception in the Human Rights Code, and no action can be taken. 

The Canadian Centre for Housing Rights and the Ontario Human Rights Commission are great resources to look into. 

Someone holding a key on a table in front of a small cardboard house 

Image by Schluesseldienst from Pixabay


Tenant Rights By Province 

These are the tenant rights and rules by province surrounding rent increases and tenant evictions (if a tenant does not pay rent) in Canada. 

Skip to the bottom for a chart with all the links to renter’s rights and official documents for your province. 


Alberta Tenant Rights

Rent Increases

There is no rent control policy in Alberta and no limits to how much a landlord can increase rent. The landlord must wait at least 12 months after the tenant moves in and space the rent increases at least 12 months apart. 

Landlords must give at least 3 months’ notice of a rent increase for a month-to-month lease and 12 weeks’ notice for a week-to-week lease. No written notice is required for a fixed-term lease. 

Learn more about rent increases in Alberta here

Tenant Evictions

If a tenant does not pay rent in Alberta, the landlord can serve them with a 14-day eviction notice. If all rent is paid on or before the termination date, the tenant can remain in the property. If the tenant objects or the landlord wants to terminate the relationship sooner, they can apply for a court hearing. 

Read more about how a landlord can end a tenancy


Tenant Rights in BC

Rent Increases

The rent increase limit for BC is 3.5%. Landlords must provide at least 3 months’ notice, and rent can only be increased once every 12 months and within the limit. 

When the tenant leaves the property, there is no limit to how much the landlord can raise the rent. 

Take a look at this page for everything you need to know about rent increases in BC. 

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant is even one day late paying rent or the rent is short, the landlord can serve them with a 10-day eviction notice. Tenants have 5 days to dispute their eviction. 

Read more about the different types of evictions in BC


Tenant Rights in Manitoba

Rent Increases

Landlords can legally increase the rent by 3%. They must notify the tenant at least 3 months before the increase takes effect. 

There is a loophole where some units are exempt from this increase cap. Most notably, landlords can apply for a larger increase if the property falls into these categories.

Tenant Evictions

If the rent is paid after the due date three or more times during the tenancy, the landlord can serve the tenant a notice of eviction on the fifth day of the rental pay period. The landlord decides how much time they want to give the tenant to move out. 

This is what the landlord must provide to the tenant in order to evict them. 


Tenant Rights in New Brunswick

Rent Increases

Landlords can increase the rent once every 12 months and must provide the tenant with at least 3 months’ written notice for a fixed-term lease and at least 6 months’ notice for week-to-week, month-to-month, or year-to-year rentals. 

Landlords cannot increase the rent to more than what is reasonable in the same area. You can see the full limits for rent increases here

Tenant Evictions

In New Brunswick, only a Residential Tenancies Officer or a Judge of the Court of King’s Bench can legally evict a tenant. 

If the tenant does not pay rent, the landlord can serve them a Notice to Vacate form, which details the amount of rent owing. This must be paid within 7 days; if it is paid within that time, they do not have to leave. 


Tenant Rights in Newfoundland & Labrador

Rent Increases

Newfoundland and Labrador does not have a rent increase policy, so there are no limits on how much the landlord can increase the rent. However, they cannot increase the rent for the first 12 months of a week-to-week or month-to-month rental agreement and for the entire length of a fixed-term agreement. 

Landlords must give tenants at least 6 months’ written notice before raising the rent for a fixed term or month-to-month lease and at least 8 weeks’ notice for a week-to-week lease. 

Take a look at this pdf for more info on increasing rent in N&L

Tenant Evictions

Landlords can evict tenants if the rent is more than 5 days late. They can then issue a termination notice for the tenant to vacate within 10 days. If the tenant pays rent and all late fees before the eviction date, the notice is void, and they can remain on the property. 

If this happens three times within 12 months, the tenant must move out, no matter if they pay rent or not. 

These are all the other reasons a landlord can terminate a lease early


Tenant Rights in Northwest Territories

Rent Increases

There is no rent control policy in the Northwest Territories. Landlords may only increase rent once every 12 months and must give tenants at least 3 months’ written notice.

Tenant Evictions

The landlord can appoint a rental officer for a hearing if the tenant does not pay rent. If they decide that orders should be made, they can take the matter to the Supreme Court and issue an eviction order. The landlord has six months to file that order.

Here’s more information on the process for filing for an eviction in NWT


Nova Scotia Tenant Rights

Rent Increases

The rent increase cap in Nova Scotia is 5.8% until December 31, 2025, or until further notice. Landlords can only raise the rent once every 12 months; the next increase must be after another 12 months.

Landlords must give tenants at least 4 months’ written notice for month-to-month and year-to-year leases and 8 weeks’ notice for week-to-week leases. 

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant is 15 days late paying their rent, the landlord can serve them with a Notice to Quit for Rental Arrears. This can be served to work with the tenant to pay their rent or start the eviction process. 

The tenant has 15 days to pay their outstanding rent in full or vacate the premises by the date on the notice. If the tenant does not take any action, the landlord can start a hearing or non-hearing process


Tenant Rights in Nunavut

Rent Increases

Nunavut does not have a rent control policy, and landlords can increase rent without limits. However, landlords can only increase the rent once every 12 months and must provide at least 3 months’ written notice. 

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant is served with an eviction notice or order to vacate and refuses to leave, the landlord can get an eviction order from the Rental Officer and register with the Nunavut Supreme Court. 

The landlord cannot kick you out or remove your property; only the Sheriff can.

Here’s more info on eviction laws in Nunavut


Tenant Rights in Ontario, Canada 

Rent Increases

In Ontario, the maximum a landlord can increase rent is 2.5% (without the approval of the Landlord and Tenant Board). This rule does not apply to certain exemptions and units, which you can see here

Landlords must not raise the rent more than once every 12 months and must give tenants written notice of a rent increase at least 90 days before. The notice should be on an LTB form.

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant does not pay rent in Ontario, the landlord can serve them with a Form N4. For a daily or weekly tenancy, the tenant has seven days to move out. For all other tenancies, the tenant has 14 days. 

The application form must be filed through the Tribunals Ontario Portal. The tenant can void the notice and stay on the rental property if they pay all rent plus any new rent due before the landlord applies to the LTB.

Here’s more info on the rental application form in Ontario

The Toronto skyline on a cloudy day 

Image by Joe from Pixabay


Tenant Rights in Prince Edward Island

Rent Increases

PEI has a maximum rent increase of 3% on all rental units. Landlords can only increase the rent once every 12 months. They must provide at least 3 weeks’ written notice for a weekly lease or at least 3 months’ written notice for a monthly lease.

Landlords may be able to raise the rent beyond the allowable limit, but they must apply to the Office of the Director of Residential Rental Property. 

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant does not pay their rent on time, the landlord can serve them with an eviction notice. The tenant has 20 days to leave the premises or 10 days to pay the full amount of rent and void the eviction notice. 

If the tenant pays the rent after 10 days, the landlord can choose to accept the rent and still proceed with the eviction. 

Here’s more on the eviction process in PEI


Tenant Rights in Quebec

Rent Increases

Quebec does not set a hard cap on rent increases, but the Tribunal administratif du logement advises landlords on how much they can raise the rent. The recommended rent cap for 2024 is 4% for unheated units. 

Both tenants and landlords must agree on the rent increase; however, tenants can refuse it. If this happens, the landlord can go to the TAL, who may still permit the increase. 

Landlords must provide tenants with at least 3 to 6 months’ written notice before the increase takes effect. 

Tenant Evictions

In Quebec, tenants who don’t pay their rent in full on the agreed date are in default as of the next day. The landlord can file an application with the Tribunal administratif du logement to get the rent owed. 

If the tenant does not pay rent for more than three weeks, the landlord can request the Tribunal to order the tenant to pay rent and can request for the lease to be terminated and the tenant evicted. 

Learn more about tenant evictions and paying the rent in Quebec here


Tenant Rights in Saskatchewan

Rent Increases

Saskatchewan does not have a policy surrounding rent increases, and there is no limit to how much the landlord can raise the rent. 

Landlords are not allowed to raise the rent in a fixed-term lease unless the landlord and tenant agree on an increase and when it will take place. For a periodic lease, landlords must give tenants written notice of an increase at least 12 months before.

Read more about rent increases in fixed-term and periodic tenancies

Tenant Evictions

If a tenant doesn’t pay rent for 15 days or more, the landlord can serve a Form 7 and evict them immediately. If the tenant does not leave, the landlord needs to apply to the Office of Residential Tenancies to repossess the property. 

Here’s what you need to know about ending a tenancy in Saskatchewan


Tenant Rights in Yukon

Rent Increases

In Yukon, a landlord can increase the rent by a maximum of 4.9%. The landlord cannot make more than one increase in a 12-month span and must give the tenant at least 3 months’ written notice before the increase. 

Tenant Evictions

If a tenant is late or does not pay rent in Yukon, the landlord can serve them with a 14-day eviction notice. If the tenant has a valid reason, they can apply to the RTO for dispute resolution within five days of receiving the notice.

Learn more about the Notice to End Tenancy in Yukon


Tenant Rights By Province – An Overview 

Here are the links to the government resources for each province in Canada:

Alberta:

British Columbia:

Manitoba: 

New Brunswick:

Newfoundland & Labrador: 

Northwest Territories

Nova Scotia

Nunavut:

Ontario:

Prince Edward Island:

Quebec: 

Saskatchewan: 

Yukon: 

If you’re renting an apartment in Canada, why not pay your rent with a credit card? With Chexy, you can earn rewards and cashback just by paying your biggest monthly expense – rent – with a credit card. You can also build credit and split rent with your roommates

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FAQs

What are my rights as a tenant without a lease?

Legal issues and disputes with landlords without a written lease agreement can be difficult. Most oral contracts are legally binding and enforceable for less than a year if you can prove the agreement's existence. 

Read more about renting without a lease

What are my tenant rights during construction in Ontario? 

Landlords must give the tenant written notice of their renovation plans, detailing the renovation dates and what will be renovated. Tenants are entitled to privacy, and landlords must provide adequate notice of entry. The rental unit must be habitable during the renovations. 

What is the renter’s bill of rights in Canada?

In March 2024, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a Canadian renter’s bill of rights to be introduced in the upcoming budget. This bill of rights requires landlords to disclose a clear history of apartment pricing, introduces consequences for renovictions, and creates a national standard lease agreement. 

Understanding your rights as a tenant is crucial when renting a home in Canada. Whether you’re signing a new lease or navigating an ongoing tenancy, knowing your rights and responsibilities can protect you from potential disputes with the landlord and ensure a smooth rental experience. 

In this guide, we’ll explore:

  • Tenant Responsibilities

  • Landlord Responsibilities 

  • What’s Included In Your Lease Agreement 

  • Tenant Rights By Province

Tenant Responsibilities 

As a tenant in Canada, you are responsible for following these house rules for tenants, no matter which province you rent in:

  • Paying your rent in full and on-time

  • Keeping the rental property clean and maintained

  • Allowing the landlord or property manager to enter your home to conduct repairs or to show prospective tenants the space if you are moving out, with proper notice

  • Contacting the landlord if anything needs to be repaired or serviced

  • Move out of the property when the lease ends and hand over the keys 

Since you do not own the property, you are not allowed to:

  • Withhold rent in the case of negligent repairs 

  • Sublet or assign the lease to someone else without contacting the landlord first

  • Change the locks without the landlord’s permission

  • Renovate without the landlord’s permission 


Landlord Responsibilities 

Some key landlord responsibilities include:

  • Collecting rent 

  • Keeping the property in good condition and in compliance with health and safety regulations 

  • Perform and pay for repairs if something breaks 

  • Provide everything that comes with the apartment and is included in the rent (i.e. refrigerator, heating, stove, washer and dryer) 

  • Get rid of household pests (if any) 

  • Provide a copy of the lease 

  • Follow a legal procedure to evict the tenant if they don’t pay rent 

  • Provide adequate notice and receive the tenant’s permission to enter the property

What to do if your landlord enters the property without permission:

Usually, the landlord must provide at least 24 hours' notice before entering the property. If they fail to do so, you can file a complaint with your province’s landlord-tenant board. Each LTB is linked in the chart below. 

The landlord can only enter without your permission in these scenarios:

  • If there is an emergency and entry is necessary to protect life or property

  • If the unit has been abandoned

  • If they have a court order

Landlords must provide you with the basic appliances and utilities like heating, electricity, hot water, cold water, a fridge, and a stove, but the cost of these may or may not be included in your rent. This is something to ask your landlord before signing the lease so you know exactly what’s included and what you’ll need to pay extra for. 

Additionally, tenants must pay for any extra basic utilities like internet and cable – these are generally not included in the rent. 

Chexy now lets you bundle your home phone, wifi, and tenant insurance coverage. Not only will this help you build credit on regular bill payments, but you can reduce your Chexy fee by 0.10% to 0.30%, helping you save money. 

Tenant’s insurance is also a common request from landlords. It’s not legally required, but some landlords prefer you to have it and will put it on the lease agreement. 


What’s Included in Your Lease Agreement in Canada? 

A lease agreement is a legally binding contract that details all of the legal terms the tenant and landlord agree to. Ensure you read and understand it fully before signing anything. Most leases will include the following:

  • The names and contact information for you and the landlord

  • The rental property address

  • The monthly rent you have agreed to pay and what utilities it includes (if any)

  • The date rent is due each month and how much the landlord can increase rent in the future 

  • How long the rental period is (i.e. six months or one year) 

  • Conditions for ending the lease or subletting it to someone else 

  • Details on when and how the landlord can enter the rental property 

  • Any repairs or upkeep that is your responsibility 

  • Any restrictions, such as pets or smoking 

Landlords can legally ask you:

  • For proof of income and an employment letter to ensure you can pay the rent 

  • How many people will live on the property

  • If you have any pets or smoke 

  • For employer or previous landlord references 

  • To run a credit check 

Landlords can not legally ask you:

  • For your social insurance number (SIN)

  • Whether you plan to have any children

  • Your marital status 

  • If you have family visiting 

  • About your ethnic background, sexuality, religion, or food preferences

Landlords cannot discriminate against you because of age, disability, family or marital status, race, religion, sex, or gender. 

What can you do if your landlord discriminates against you? 

This type of discrimination violates the Human Rights Code, and you can file a complaint with the Human Rights Tribunal in your province. 

For example, if you live in Ontario, you can file a complaint with the Human Rights Tribunal in Ontario. However, if you are sharing a kitchen or bathroom with the landlord, this falls under an exception in the Human Rights Code, and no action can be taken. 

The Canadian Centre for Housing Rights and the Ontario Human Rights Commission are great resources to look into. 

Someone holding a key on a table in front of a small cardboard house 

Image by Schluesseldienst from Pixabay


Tenant Rights By Province 

These are the tenant rights and rules by province surrounding rent increases and tenant evictions (if a tenant does not pay rent) in Canada. 

Skip to the bottom for a chart with all the links to renter’s rights and official documents for your province. 


Alberta Tenant Rights

Rent Increases

There is no rent control policy in Alberta and no limits to how much a landlord can increase rent. The landlord must wait at least 12 months after the tenant moves in and space the rent increases at least 12 months apart. 

Landlords must give at least 3 months’ notice of a rent increase for a month-to-month lease and 12 weeks’ notice for a week-to-week lease. No written notice is required for a fixed-term lease. 

Learn more about rent increases in Alberta here

Tenant Evictions

If a tenant does not pay rent in Alberta, the landlord can serve them with a 14-day eviction notice. If all rent is paid on or before the termination date, the tenant can remain in the property. If the tenant objects or the landlord wants to terminate the relationship sooner, they can apply for a court hearing. 

Read more about how a landlord can end a tenancy


Tenant Rights in BC

Rent Increases

The rent increase limit for BC is 3.5%. Landlords must provide at least 3 months’ notice, and rent can only be increased once every 12 months and within the limit. 

When the tenant leaves the property, there is no limit to how much the landlord can raise the rent. 

Take a look at this page for everything you need to know about rent increases in BC. 

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant is even one day late paying rent or the rent is short, the landlord can serve them with a 10-day eviction notice. Tenants have 5 days to dispute their eviction. 

Read more about the different types of evictions in BC


Tenant Rights in Manitoba

Rent Increases

Landlords can legally increase the rent by 3%. They must notify the tenant at least 3 months before the increase takes effect. 

There is a loophole where some units are exempt from this increase cap. Most notably, landlords can apply for a larger increase if the property falls into these categories.

Tenant Evictions

If the rent is paid after the due date three or more times during the tenancy, the landlord can serve the tenant a notice of eviction on the fifth day of the rental pay period. The landlord decides how much time they want to give the tenant to move out. 

This is what the landlord must provide to the tenant in order to evict them. 


Tenant Rights in New Brunswick

Rent Increases

Landlords can increase the rent once every 12 months and must provide the tenant with at least 3 months’ written notice for a fixed-term lease and at least 6 months’ notice for week-to-week, month-to-month, or year-to-year rentals. 

Landlords cannot increase the rent to more than what is reasonable in the same area. You can see the full limits for rent increases here

Tenant Evictions

In New Brunswick, only a Residential Tenancies Officer or a Judge of the Court of King’s Bench can legally evict a tenant. 

If the tenant does not pay rent, the landlord can serve them a Notice to Vacate form, which details the amount of rent owing. This must be paid within 7 days; if it is paid within that time, they do not have to leave. 


Tenant Rights in Newfoundland & Labrador

Rent Increases

Newfoundland and Labrador does not have a rent increase policy, so there are no limits on how much the landlord can increase the rent. However, they cannot increase the rent for the first 12 months of a week-to-week or month-to-month rental agreement and for the entire length of a fixed-term agreement. 

Landlords must give tenants at least 6 months’ written notice before raising the rent for a fixed term or month-to-month lease and at least 8 weeks’ notice for a week-to-week lease. 

Take a look at this pdf for more info on increasing rent in N&L

Tenant Evictions

Landlords can evict tenants if the rent is more than 5 days late. They can then issue a termination notice for the tenant to vacate within 10 days. If the tenant pays rent and all late fees before the eviction date, the notice is void, and they can remain on the property. 

If this happens three times within 12 months, the tenant must move out, no matter if they pay rent or not. 

These are all the other reasons a landlord can terminate a lease early


Tenant Rights in Northwest Territories

Rent Increases

There is no rent control policy in the Northwest Territories. Landlords may only increase rent once every 12 months and must give tenants at least 3 months’ written notice.

Tenant Evictions

The landlord can appoint a rental officer for a hearing if the tenant does not pay rent. If they decide that orders should be made, they can take the matter to the Supreme Court and issue an eviction order. The landlord has six months to file that order.

Here’s more information on the process for filing for an eviction in NWT


Nova Scotia Tenant Rights

Rent Increases

The rent increase cap in Nova Scotia is 5.8% until December 31, 2025, or until further notice. Landlords can only raise the rent once every 12 months; the next increase must be after another 12 months.

Landlords must give tenants at least 4 months’ written notice for month-to-month and year-to-year leases and 8 weeks’ notice for week-to-week leases. 

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant is 15 days late paying their rent, the landlord can serve them with a Notice to Quit for Rental Arrears. This can be served to work with the tenant to pay their rent or start the eviction process. 

The tenant has 15 days to pay their outstanding rent in full or vacate the premises by the date on the notice. If the tenant does not take any action, the landlord can start a hearing or non-hearing process


Tenant Rights in Nunavut

Rent Increases

Nunavut does not have a rent control policy, and landlords can increase rent without limits. However, landlords can only increase the rent once every 12 months and must provide at least 3 months’ written notice. 

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant is served with an eviction notice or order to vacate and refuses to leave, the landlord can get an eviction order from the Rental Officer and register with the Nunavut Supreme Court. 

The landlord cannot kick you out or remove your property; only the Sheriff can.

Here’s more info on eviction laws in Nunavut


Tenant Rights in Ontario, Canada 

Rent Increases

In Ontario, the maximum a landlord can increase rent is 2.5% (without the approval of the Landlord and Tenant Board). This rule does not apply to certain exemptions and units, which you can see here

Landlords must not raise the rent more than once every 12 months and must give tenants written notice of a rent increase at least 90 days before. The notice should be on an LTB form.

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant does not pay rent in Ontario, the landlord can serve them with a Form N4. For a daily or weekly tenancy, the tenant has seven days to move out. For all other tenancies, the tenant has 14 days. 

The application form must be filed through the Tribunals Ontario Portal. The tenant can void the notice and stay on the rental property if they pay all rent plus any new rent due before the landlord applies to the LTB.

Here’s more info on the rental application form in Ontario

The Toronto skyline on a cloudy day 

Image by Joe from Pixabay


Tenant Rights in Prince Edward Island

Rent Increases

PEI has a maximum rent increase of 3% on all rental units. Landlords can only increase the rent once every 12 months. They must provide at least 3 weeks’ written notice for a weekly lease or at least 3 months’ written notice for a monthly lease.

Landlords may be able to raise the rent beyond the allowable limit, but they must apply to the Office of the Director of Residential Rental Property. 

Tenant Evictions

If the tenant does not pay their rent on time, the landlord can serve them with an eviction notice. The tenant has 20 days to leave the premises or 10 days to pay the full amount of rent and void the eviction notice. 

If the tenant pays the rent after 10 days, the landlord can choose to accept the rent and still proceed with the eviction. 

Here’s more on the eviction process in PEI


Tenant Rights in Quebec

Rent Increases

Quebec does not set a hard cap on rent increases, but the Tribunal administratif du logement advises landlords on how much they can raise the rent. The recommended rent cap for 2024 is 4% for unheated units. 

Both tenants and landlords must agree on the rent increase; however, tenants can refuse it. If this happens, the landlord can go to the TAL, who may still permit the increase. 

Landlords must provide tenants with at least 3 to 6 months’ written notice before the increase takes effect. 

Tenant Evictions

In Quebec, tenants who don’t pay their rent in full on the agreed date are in default as of the next day. The landlord can file an application with the Tribunal administratif du logement to get the rent owed. 

If the tenant does not pay rent for more than three weeks, the landlord can request the Tribunal to order the tenant to pay rent and can request for the lease to be terminated and the tenant evicted. 

Learn more about tenant evictions and paying the rent in Quebec here


Tenant Rights in Saskatchewan

Rent Increases

Saskatchewan does not have a policy surrounding rent increases, and there is no limit to how much the landlord can raise the rent. 

Landlords are not allowed to raise the rent in a fixed-term lease unless the landlord and tenant agree on an increase and when it will take place. For a periodic lease, landlords must give tenants written notice of an increase at least 12 months before.

Read more about rent increases in fixed-term and periodic tenancies

Tenant Evictions

If a tenant doesn’t pay rent for 15 days or more, the landlord can serve a Form 7 and evict them immediately. If the tenant does not leave, the landlord needs to apply to the Office of Residential Tenancies to repossess the property. 

Here’s what you need to know about ending a tenancy in Saskatchewan


Tenant Rights in Yukon

Rent Increases

In Yukon, a landlord can increase the rent by a maximum of 4.9%. The landlord cannot make more than one increase in a 12-month span and must give the tenant at least 3 months’ written notice before the increase. 

Tenant Evictions

If a tenant is late or does not pay rent in Yukon, the landlord can serve them with a 14-day eviction notice. If the tenant has a valid reason, they can apply to the RTO for dispute resolution within five days of receiving the notice.

Learn more about the Notice to End Tenancy in Yukon


Tenant Rights By Province – An Overview 

Here are the links to the government resources for each province in Canada:

Alberta:

British Columbia:

Manitoba: 

New Brunswick:

Newfoundland & Labrador: 

Northwest Territories

Nova Scotia

Nunavut:

Ontario:

Prince Edward Island:

Quebec: 

Saskatchewan: 

Yukon: 

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FAQs

What are my rights as a tenant without a lease?

Legal issues and disputes with landlords without a written lease agreement can be difficult. Most oral contracts are legally binding and enforceable for less than a year if you can prove the agreement's existence. 

Read more about renting without a lease

What are my tenant rights during construction in Ontario? 

Landlords must give the tenant written notice of their renovation plans, detailing the renovation dates and what will be renovated. Tenants are entitled to privacy, and landlords must provide adequate notice of entry. The rental unit must be habitable during the renovations. 

What is the renter’s bill of rights in Canada?

In March 2024, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced a Canadian renter’s bill of rights to be introduced in the upcoming budget. This bill of rights requires landlords to disclose a clear history of apartment pricing, introduces consequences for renovictions, and creates a national standard lease agreement.