Everything You Need to Know About Renting in Canada: A Comprehensive Guide

Jul 3, 2024

Houses and apartments
Houses and apartments

Everything You Need to Know About Renting in Canada: A Comprehensive Guide

Today’s tough rental market can be difficult to navigate and find a place to rent, especially in big cities like Toronto and Vancouver. However, worry not, as we’re here to help you with the entire rental process. 

In this renter’s guide, we’ll take a look at the big picture of renting in Canada, covering topics like tenant rights, how to find a rental property, some laws and regulations on renting in Canada, and our top tips. 

Once you’ve found your dream rental apartment, consider using a platform like Chexy to earn rewards on rent, your biggest monthly expense. 

Rights and Responsibilities as a Tenant

Tenants have rights and responsibilities. Tenancy regulations vary between provinces, but some main standards of practice are the same across all provinces and territories. 

Landlords are legally required to comply with the minimum health, safety, housing, and maintenance standards.

Tenants must:

  • Be responsible and pay rent on time

  • Communicate any issues relating to the living space

  • Not interfere with the landlord

  • Allow the landlord entry to the premises (with advance notice) 

Depending on the province or territory you live in, your landlord presumably:

  • Cannot restrict access to your rental property

  • Cannot enter your rental property without giving you proper notice first 

  • Cannot discriminate against you because of age, race, religion, ethnicity, gender, disability, or sexual orientation 

  • Cannot evict you if you are not behind on rent and have not broken any lease terms 

  • Is responsible for making necessary repairs 

Most provinces also require tenants to provide a security deposit in addition to the first and last month’s rent, although these regulations vary by province. 

Landlords can also increase your rent in most provinces, although the specific rules and rent increase caps vary, and most provinces change the limit each year. 

Requirements to Rent in Canada

Below are the lease agreement and documents required to rent in Canada, as well as the optional tenants' insurance. 

Documents Needed 

To rent a property in Canada, you must have several documents that show your trustworthiness and ability to pay rent on time. 

These five documents are required for renting in Canada:

  1. Identification: An up-to-date, government-issued photo ID, like your driver’s license, permanent resident card, or passport. 

  2. Proof of income: Pay stubs and/or an employment letter. Usually, you’ll need the last three months of pay stubs to show your net earnings. The employment letter informs the landlord that you’ll remain employed for the foreseeable future.

  3. Bank statements: These show your ability to pay rent on time every month.

  4. Rental history: The landlord may run a background check to see your previous rental history. The longer you’ve been renting, the better prospective tenant you are. 

  5. References: Similar to employment references, rental references showcase your ability to maintain good relationships. 

Do You Need Tenant Insurance? 

Tenants insurance is coverage that protects you and your belongings if damage, theft, or an accident occurs on your rental property. While your landlord or property manager may recommend it, you don’t actually need renter’s insurance in Canada. 

The laws regarding this type of insurance vary based on province, but you are generally not required to have tenant’s insurance, and a landlord cannot force you to. 

The Basics of Lease Agreements in Canada

When renting in Canada, you can have a written lease or a verbal rental agreement. It is highly suggested that you have a written agreement so that everything is clearly specified and both parties can easily refer to it if a conflict arises. 

The lease agreement outlines terms for:

  • The rent and how much is to be paid monthly 

  • The length of tenancy 

  • The parties responsible

  • What is and isn’t included in the rent 

  • Conditions for terminating the lease

Each province has different requirements for a rental application or lease agreement, so be sure to refer to your province-specific guidelines. 

Two people signing contracts on a desk

Photo by Romain Dancre on Unsplash

How to Pay Rent in Canada 

You can pay rent by e-transfer, direct deposit, cash, cheque, or post-dated cheque. Your landlord may have a preference but should accept all forms of payment. 

If you are forgetful or know money will be tight on the first of the month, you can also pre-pay rent, but make sure to communicate this with your landlord. 

Can You Pay Rent With a Credit Card? 

Typically, landlords don’t accept credit cards to pay rent, but Chexy allows you to pay rent with your credit card and earn rewards. 

With Chexy, you can earn travel rewards points and even get up to 4% cash back, depending on the credit card you use. 

Your landlord doesn’t need to do anything. All you need to do is sign up to Chexy and connect your credit card. Your rent will automatically be charged to your credit card and sent via e-transfer to your landlord on rent day. 

Some other benefits of paying rent with a credit card through Chexy include building credit, splitting rent, and earning rewards multipliers. 

What Is Included in Rent Payments?

While the majority of your monthly rent payment includes the rent itself, there are several other factors you need to think about when budgeting for rent. 

Utilities like water, electricity, and gas may or may not be included in your rent. Other inclusions and amenities that could be separate from your rent include:

  • Appliances (stove, fridge, etc.)

  • Air conditioning 

  • Parking 

  • Furniture

  • Internet 

  • Cable 

Discuss with your landlord what amenities are included in your rent before signing your lease. 

How Much Should You Spend On Rent?

You may be wondering, how much of your income should rent be? 

The 30% guideline says you should spend 30% of your monthly gross income on rent. For example, if you earn $4,000 per month before taxes, you should spend about $1,200 on rent. 

This guideline is a great starting point, but with rising rental prices, most people spend more than 30% of their income on rent. If you live in a city like Toronto or Vancouver, where the average one-bedroom apartment costs over $2,500 a month, this rule isn’t always feasible. 

You could also use the 50/30/20 budget as a guide to determine how much you can pay for rent. This method gives 50% of your income to needs, 30% to wants, and 20% to savings and debt payments. 

When Do You Pay the First and Last Month’s Rent? 

The due dates for the first and last month’s rent can vary by province and are different from security deposits.

Typically, the first and last month’s rent is due on an agreed-upon date by you and your landlord. It is due before the tenancy starts, and the first month’s rent covers you until the second month. 

The last month’s rent is securely kept by the landlord and used to pay your last month of tenancy before moving out. 

What is the Minimum Credit Score for Renting an Apartment in Canada? 

The minimum credit score for renting an apartment in Canada is 640 and above. In more competitive rental markets with higher average rent prices, landlords may require your credit score to be 700 or above. 

A fair credit score is from 640 to 700, so if you fall in that category, you should have no problem securing a rental. 

If you pay rent with a credit card through Chexy, you can build your credit for free with timely rent payments every month. 

How to Find a Property to Rent 

Depending on the type of property you’re looking to rent, there are several ways you can find your dream rental. 

Types of Properties to Rent in Canada

In Canada, there are three main types of properties to rent:

  • Apartment: Perfect for those looking for cheaper rentals or who aren’t looking to live there long-term. 

  • Condo: Privately owned units (by an individual, not a company) inside a condominium complex. They often offer amenities like a gym, pool, and common area. 

  • House: Great for families or shared accommodation for multiple people, this includes townhouses, detached homes, and duplexes. 

If you’re on a budget and looking to save money or don’t want to live alone, you can get a room in a shared house or find a roommate and look for an apartment together. 

Where to Find Rental Properties

There are quite a few websites to find rental properties in Canada. These are the best and most popular ones:

  • Rentals.ca: Provides rental listings with tons of filters, an interactive map, and a monthly rent report.

  • RentSeeker: Listings in many major Canadian cities and city guides.

  • Zumper: A free, all-in-one rental listing platform available all over Canada.

  • Kijiji: You can browse properties for long-term and short-term rentals on the Real Estate section, as well as rooms and roommates to buddy up with.

  • Padmapper: Rental listings in Canada and the US, an interactive map, and easy-to-use search filters. 

The Rental Market in Canada 

The rental market in Canada has record-high average rent growth (8%) and record-low vacancy rates (1.5%). What does this mean if you’re looking to rent a property? 

You’ll find apartments and condos at super high prices like never before, with competitive rental conditions across major cities like Toronto and Vancouver. 

However, don’t let this discourage you from looking for your dream space. Although the rental market is at a record high, you can try to negotiate your rent or find a roommate to lower costs. You can also build credit on your rent payments

Average Rent in Canada

The average rent in Canada for a one-bedroom is $2,202, which surpassed an all-time high in May 2024. 

Based on rental data, this is the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the big cities:

  • Toronto: $2,479

  • Vancouver: $2,671

  • Montreal: $1,763

  • Calgary: $1,733

  • Edmonton: $1,367

  • Ottawa: $1,994 

The Toronto skyline on a bright day

Photo by amanda on Unsplash

Rent Increases in Canada

Six provinces (BC, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, PEI, and Yukon) have their own laws surrounding rent increases in Canada. However, the general rules surrounding rent control are:

Increase Limits

Rent increase limits are set by each province and are measured as a percentage of the rent paid. This can be anywhere from 2.3% up to 10%, and some provinces don’t even have a cap.

Frequency Limits

This is the frequency with which landlords can increase the rent. Typically, they are not allowed to increase rent more than once a year. Each province has its own notice period.

Vacancy Decontrol

When a tenant moves out of a rental, the landlord can increase the rent for the new tenant. Manitoba and PEI have rent control laws in place and are the only provinces that do not allow vacancy decontrol. 

How to Terminate a Lease

Each province in Canada has different rules about terminating a lease early. You’ll need to review your contract and rights and discuss all the options with your landlord.  

You can end your rental agreement in the following ways:

End of the Lease 

When you sign a lease, the term is set generally between 1 and 2 years. In most cases, the lease will continue and renew without you having to do anything. 

If you want to terminate your lease at the end of the term, inform your landlord in writing within the notice window in your contract. 

Sublet 

If you need to end your lease early, you may be able to find someone to take over your lease as a sublet. This often entails you, as the tenant, being responsible for the sublessee, who pays you the rent, which you pass on to the landlord. 

Assignation

In some circumstances, the landlord and tenant will work together to find a new tenant to transfer the lease to their name. Though it may come with fees, this is often preferred and more secure than subletting. 

Eviction Laws in Canada

Eviction laws in Canada protect tenants and give them adequate time to move out. They are generally the same but vary slightly by province. 

These are the reasons a landlord may choose to evict a tenant:

  • Violation of contract: The landlord can evict you if you violate any of the terms of the lease agreement, such as keeping pets, smoking, or throwing parties. 

  • Renovations: With advance notice, the landlord can evict you if they require a large renovation or are demolishing the property. 

  • Selling the property: With the proper notice, the landlord can evict you if they are selling the property. 

  • Personal use: If the landlord needs the rental unit for themselves, they are legally allowed to evict you as long as they provide around two months' notice. In some provinces, you can get compensation

  • Tenant not paying rent: Landlords can evict tenants who refuse to pay rent, as this is a clear violation of the lease. 

  • A cause for eviction: This requires a court order, but eviction can be immediate. If you damage property or impose risk on other tenants, the landlord can evict you. 

Assistance to Help Pay Rent in Canada

Canada has a few federal and provincial benefits to help low-income families and individuals pay rent. 

The federal benefit for all Canadians is the Canada Housing Benefit, which gives you a one-time payment of $500 to help with the cost of housing in today’s tough rental market.

Provincial housing and rental benefits include:

Tips for Renting in Canada  

Follow these top tips for a successful rental search:

  • Create a budget: Sticking to your budget is important to ensure you’re able to pay your rent every month. Try not to get tempted to look at properties that are way out of your budget. 

  • Look around and view all properties: Don’t just settle for the first rental you see. Take your time and look around. 

  • Know the current rental market: Take a look at average rental prices in your area, top amenities, neighbourhoods, walking, and transit scores. 

  • Review your lease agreement carefully: Read all lease terms to ensure you understand everything before signing.  

  • Consider getting tenant insurance: Although it isn’t mandatory, renters insurance can protect your belongings in the event of an *unlikely* accident. 

  • Beware of common rental scams: If you see any red flags or a deal that looks too good to be true, look elsewhere. It’s not worth getting involved in a potential scam. 

Final Thoughts

While renting in Canada may seem vast and daunting for a first-time renter, this renter’s guide has covered what you should know about the rental application process and everything in between. 

Once you’ve found your perfect rental property, consider paying rent with Chexy, a platform where you can earn rewards and build your credit score just by paying rent. 

Get started with Chexy today. 

Subscribe to The Chexy Rundown for exclusive travel deals and ways to maximize your credit card rewards that you won’t find anywhere else. 

FAQs

What if a tenant doesn’t pay rent? 

You may be wondering what happens if you don’t pay rent and move out. If the tenant does not pay their rent by the due date, the landlord can give the tenant notice to pay the rent they owe or move out. If they do neither, the landlord can apply to the LTB for an order to evict the tenant and collect the rent they owe. Here is what can happen in Ontario

Do tenants pay tax on rent? 

Tenants do not pay tax on monthly rent payments, as long-term residential leases are exempt from HST in all provinces. 

What are some common rental scams?

Some common signs of rental scams that you should avoid include:

  • A copied or vague listing

  • The address isn’t verified

  • No lease is available

  • You are asked to pay money upfront or in an unusual way

  • The rent is too low

  • You are not allowed to tour the property 

What do I need to bring to a rental viewing in Canada?

If you are going into an apartment viewing with the intention of signing a lease, you should bring proof of all income sources, a government-issued photo ID, and a previous landlord reference. 

Everything You Need to Know About Renting in Canada: A Comprehensive Guide

Today’s tough rental market can be difficult to navigate and find a place to rent, especially in big cities like Toronto and Vancouver. However, worry not, as we’re here to help you with the entire rental process. 

In this renter’s guide, we’ll take a look at the big picture of renting in Canada, covering topics like tenant rights, how to find a rental property, some laws and regulations on renting in Canada, and our top tips. 

Once you’ve found your dream rental apartment, consider using a platform like Chexy to earn rewards on rent, your biggest monthly expense. 

Rights and Responsibilities as a Tenant

Tenants have rights and responsibilities. Tenancy regulations vary between provinces, but some main standards of practice are the same across all provinces and territories. 

Landlords are legally required to comply with the minimum health, safety, housing, and maintenance standards.

Tenants must:

  • Be responsible and pay rent on time

  • Communicate any issues relating to the living space

  • Not interfere with the landlord

  • Allow the landlord entry to the premises (with advance notice) 

Depending on the province or territory you live in, your landlord presumably:

  • Cannot restrict access to your rental property

  • Cannot enter your rental property without giving you proper notice first 

  • Cannot discriminate against you because of age, race, religion, ethnicity, gender, disability, or sexual orientation 

  • Cannot evict you if you are not behind on rent and have not broken any lease terms 

  • Is responsible for making necessary repairs 

Most provinces also require tenants to provide a security deposit in addition to the first and last month’s rent, although these regulations vary by province. 

Landlords can also increase your rent in most provinces, although the specific rules and rent increase caps vary, and most provinces change the limit each year. 

Requirements to Rent in Canada

Below are the lease agreement and documents required to rent in Canada, as well as the optional tenants' insurance. 

Documents Needed 

To rent a property in Canada, you must have several documents that show your trustworthiness and ability to pay rent on time. 

These five documents are required for renting in Canada:

  1. Identification: An up-to-date, government-issued photo ID, like your driver’s license, permanent resident card, or passport. 

  2. Proof of income: Pay stubs and/or an employment letter. Usually, you’ll need the last three months of pay stubs to show your net earnings. The employment letter informs the landlord that you’ll remain employed for the foreseeable future.

  3. Bank statements: These show your ability to pay rent on time every month.

  4. Rental history: The landlord may run a background check to see your previous rental history. The longer you’ve been renting, the better prospective tenant you are. 

  5. References: Similar to employment references, rental references showcase your ability to maintain good relationships. 

Do You Need Tenant Insurance? 

Tenants insurance is coverage that protects you and your belongings if damage, theft, or an accident occurs on your rental property. While your landlord or property manager may recommend it, you don’t actually need renter’s insurance in Canada. 

The laws regarding this type of insurance vary based on province, but you are generally not required to have tenant’s insurance, and a landlord cannot force you to. 

The Basics of Lease Agreements in Canada

When renting in Canada, you can have a written lease or a verbal rental agreement. It is highly suggested that you have a written agreement so that everything is clearly specified and both parties can easily refer to it if a conflict arises. 

The lease agreement outlines terms for:

  • The rent and how much is to be paid monthly 

  • The length of tenancy 

  • The parties responsible

  • What is and isn’t included in the rent 

  • Conditions for terminating the lease

Each province has different requirements for a rental application or lease agreement, so be sure to refer to your province-specific guidelines. 

Two people signing contracts on a desk

Photo by Romain Dancre on Unsplash

How to Pay Rent in Canada 

You can pay rent by e-transfer, direct deposit, cash, cheque, or post-dated cheque. Your landlord may have a preference but should accept all forms of payment. 

If you are forgetful or know money will be tight on the first of the month, you can also pre-pay rent, but make sure to communicate this with your landlord. 

Can You Pay Rent With a Credit Card? 

Typically, landlords don’t accept credit cards to pay rent, but Chexy allows you to pay rent with your credit card and earn rewards. 

With Chexy, you can earn travel rewards points and even get up to 4% cash back, depending on the credit card you use. 

Your landlord doesn’t need to do anything. All you need to do is sign up to Chexy and connect your credit card. Your rent will automatically be charged to your credit card and sent via e-transfer to your landlord on rent day. 

Some other benefits of paying rent with a credit card through Chexy include building credit, splitting rent, and earning rewards multipliers. 

What Is Included in Rent Payments?

While the majority of your monthly rent payment includes the rent itself, there are several other factors you need to think about when budgeting for rent. 

Utilities like water, electricity, and gas may or may not be included in your rent. Other inclusions and amenities that could be separate from your rent include:

  • Appliances (stove, fridge, etc.)

  • Air conditioning 

  • Parking 

  • Furniture

  • Internet 

  • Cable 

Discuss with your landlord what amenities are included in your rent before signing your lease. 

How Much Should You Spend On Rent?

You may be wondering, how much of your income should rent be? 

The 30% guideline says you should spend 30% of your monthly gross income on rent. For example, if you earn $4,000 per month before taxes, you should spend about $1,200 on rent. 

This guideline is a great starting point, but with rising rental prices, most people spend more than 30% of their income on rent. If you live in a city like Toronto or Vancouver, where the average one-bedroom apartment costs over $2,500 a month, this rule isn’t always feasible. 

You could also use the 50/30/20 budget as a guide to determine how much you can pay for rent. This method gives 50% of your income to needs, 30% to wants, and 20% to savings and debt payments. 

When Do You Pay the First and Last Month’s Rent? 

The due dates for the first and last month’s rent can vary by province and are different from security deposits.

Typically, the first and last month’s rent is due on an agreed-upon date by you and your landlord. It is due before the tenancy starts, and the first month’s rent covers you until the second month. 

The last month’s rent is securely kept by the landlord and used to pay your last month of tenancy before moving out. 

What is the Minimum Credit Score for Renting an Apartment in Canada? 

The minimum credit score for renting an apartment in Canada is 640 and above. In more competitive rental markets with higher average rent prices, landlords may require your credit score to be 700 or above. 

A fair credit score is from 640 to 700, so if you fall in that category, you should have no problem securing a rental. 

If you pay rent with a credit card through Chexy, you can build your credit for free with timely rent payments every month. 

How to Find a Property to Rent 

Depending on the type of property you’re looking to rent, there are several ways you can find your dream rental. 

Types of Properties to Rent in Canada

In Canada, there are three main types of properties to rent:

  • Apartment: Perfect for those looking for cheaper rentals or who aren’t looking to live there long-term. 

  • Condo: Privately owned units (by an individual, not a company) inside a condominium complex. They often offer amenities like a gym, pool, and common area. 

  • House: Great for families or shared accommodation for multiple people, this includes townhouses, detached homes, and duplexes. 

If you’re on a budget and looking to save money or don’t want to live alone, you can get a room in a shared house or find a roommate and look for an apartment together. 

Where to Find Rental Properties

There are quite a few websites to find rental properties in Canada. These are the best and most popular ones:

  • Rentals.ca: Provides rental listings with tons of filters, an interactive map, and a monthly rent report.

  • RentSeeker: Listings in many major Canadian cities and city guides.

  • Zumper: A free, all-in-one rental listing platform available all over Canada.

  • Kijiji: You can browse properties for long-term and short-term rentals on the Real Estate section, as well as rooms and roommates to buddy up with.

  • Padmapper: Rental listings in Canada and the US, an interactive map, and easy-to-use search filters. 

The Rental Market in Canada 

The rental market in Canada has record-high average rent growth (8%) and record-low vacancy rates (1.5%). What does this mean if you’re looking to rent a property? 

You’ll find apartments and condos at super high prices like never before, with competitive rental conditions across major cities like Toronto and Vancouver. 

However, don’t let this discourage you from looking for your dream space. Although the rental market is at a record high, you can try to negotiate your rent or find a roommate to lower costs. You can also build credit on your rent payments

Average Rent in Canada

The average rent in Canada for a one-bedroom is $2,202, which surpassed an all-time high in May 2024. 

Based on rental data, this is the average rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the big cities:

  • Toronto: $2,479

  • Vancouver: $2,671

  • Montreal: $1,763

  • Calgary: $1,733

  • Edmonton: $1,367

  • Ottawa: $1,994 

The Toronto skyline on a bright day

Photo by amanda on Unsplash

Rent Increases in Canada

Six provinces (BC, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, PEI, and Yukon) have their own laws surrounding rent increases in Canada. However, the general rules surrounding rent control are:

Increase Limits

Rent increase limits are set by each province and are measured as a percentage of the rent paid. This can be anywhere from 2.3% up to 10%, and some provinces don’t even have a cap.

Frequency Limits

This is the frequency with which landlords can increase the rent. Typically, they are not allowed to increase rent more than once a year. Each province has its own notice period.

Vacancy Decontrol

When a tenant moves out of a rental, the landlord can increase the rent for the new tenant. Manitoba and PEI have rent control laws in place and are the only provinces that do not allow vacancy decontrol. 

How to Terminate a Lease

Each province in Canada has different rules about terminating a lease early. You’ll need to review your contract and rights and discuss all the options with your landlord.  

You can end your rental agreement in the following ways:

End of the Lease 

When you sign a lease, the term is set generally between 1 and 2 years. In most cases, the lease will continue and renew without you having to do anything. 

If you want to terminate your lease at the end of the term, inform your landlord in writing within the notice window in your contract. 

Sublet 

If you need to end your lease early, you may be able to find someone to take over your lease as a sublet. This often entails you, as the tenant, being responsible for the sublessee, who pays you the rent, which you pass on to the landlord. 

Assignation

In some circumstances, the landlord and tenant will work together to find a new tenant to transfer the lease to their name. Though it may come with fees, this is often preferred and more secure than subletting. 

Eviction Laws in Canada

Eviction laws in Canada protect tenants and give them adequate time to move out. They are generally the same but vary slightly by province. 

These are the reasons a landlord may choose to evict a tenant:

  • Violation of contract: The landlord can evict you if you violate any of the terms of the lease agreement, such as keeping pets, smoking, or throwing parties. 

  • Renovations: With advance notice, the landlord can evict you if they require a large renovation or are demolishing the property. 

  • Selling the property: With the proper notice, the landlord can evict you if they are selling the property. 

  • Personal use: If the landlord needs the rental unit for themselves, they are legally allowed to evict you as long as they provide around two months' notice. In some provinces, you can get compensation

  • Tenant not paying rent: Landlords can evict tenants who refuse to pay rent, as this is a clear violation of the lease. 

  • A cause for eviction: This requires a court order, but eviction can be immediate. If you damage property or impose risk on other tenants, the landlord can evict you. 

Assistance to Help Pay Rent in Canada

Canada has a few federal and provincial benefits to help low-income families and individuals pay rent. 

The federal benefit for all Canadians is the Canada Housing Benefit, which gives you a one-time payment of $500 to help with the cost of housing in today’s tough rental market.

Provincial housing and rental benefits include:

Tips for Renting in Canada  

Follow these top tips for a successful rental search:

  • Create a budget: Sticking to your budget is important to ensure you’re able to pay your rent every month. Try not to get tempted to look at properties that are way out of your budget. 

  • Look around and view all properties: Don’t just settle for the first rental you see. Take your time and look around. 

  • Know the current rental market: Take a look at average rental prices in your area, top amenities, neighbourhoods, walking, and transit scores. 

  • Review your lease agreement carefully: Read all lease terms to ensure you understand everything before signing.  

  • Consider getting tenant insurance: Although it isn’t mandatory, renters insurance can protect your belongings in the event of an *unlikely* accident. 

  • Beware of common rental scams: If you see any red flags or a deal that looks too good to be true, look elsewhere. It’s not worth getting involved in a potential scam. 

Final Thoughts

While renting in Canada may seem vast and daunting for a first-time renter, this renter’s guide has covered what you should know about the rental application process and everything in between. 

Once you’ve found your perfect rental property, consider paying rent with Chexy, a platform where you can earn rewards and build your credit score just by paying rent. 

Get started with Chexy today. 

Subscribe to The Chexy Rundown for exclusive travel deals and ways to maximize your credit card rewards that you won’t find anywhere else. 

FAQs

What if a tenant doesn’t pay rent? 

You may be wondering what happens if you don’t pay rent and move out. If the tenant does not pay their rent by the due date, the landlord can give the tenant notice to pay the rent they owe or move out. If they do neither, the landlord can apply to the LTB for an order to evict the tenant and collect the rent they owe. Here is what can happen in Ontario

Do tenants pay tax on rent? 

Tenants do not pay tax on monthly rent payments, as long-term residential leases are exempt from HST in all provinces. 

What are some common rental scams?

Some common signs of rental scams that you should avoid include:

  • A copied or vague listing

  • The address isn’t verified

  • No lease is available

  • You are asked to pay money upfront or in an unusual way

  • The rent is too low

  • You are not allowed to tour the property 

What do I need to bring to a rental viewing in Canada?

If you are going into an apartment viewing with the intention of signing a lease, you should bring proof of all income sources, a government-issued photo ID, and a previous landlord reference.